Freedom 55 Financial

How to evaluate your first professional job offer

Four things to consider before accepting your first job

As a new graduate, navigating the job market can be a challenge. After the often lengthy search and application process, you might feel accepting your first offer is the only choice. While taking the first position you’re offered may be the right option for you, there are several factors worth considering when evaluating a job offer.

Workload and work-life balance

Throughout the interview process, it’s important to ask questions that will help you evaluate the day-to-day responsibilities of the position. You’ll also want to determine the company’s policies on work-life balance.

Is this a position that requires you to be connected 24/7 and available at a moment’s notice? Will the stress-level and hours of work be compatible will your lifestyle and personal commitments? What’s the company’s position on flexible working hours? While there may be an element of ‘paying your dues’ associated with your first job, make sure the workload and corporate philosophy on work-life balance is right for you.

Culture and fit

Workplace culture is a key consideration for many millennials who want to feel their work is meaningful and not just a nine-to-five destination. If you fit that profile, it’s a good idea to inquire about things like teamwork, philanthropy and social events.

Does the organization encourage collaboration or will you be working on your own? Does the company participate in charitable giving or give back to the community in other ways? Will there be organized events to socialize with your colleagues to encourage engagement? Remember that determining the right fit is a two-way street. If you don’t gel with your prospective boss or team members, it might be worth continuing your job search.

Development and progression

While it’s generally accepted that millenials will change jobs more often than previous generations, considering progression opportunities within an organization is an important factor that can impact your future success. You’ll likely also want to consider the organization’s stance on personal and professional development.

It shows initiative to ask about your potential growth trajectory within the company during the interview process. If you see yourself in a leadership role in the future, for example, ask about the potential for in-house leadership workshops, mentorship opportunities or tuition reimbursement to help you get there.

Compensation and benefits

While salary and benefits are top of mind for most job seekers, there may be a gap in reality vs. expectations for recent graduates. In most cases, entry-level salaries aren’t very negotiable and reflect limited experience. If you know you can provide some advanced level of expertise, you may want to consider negotiating for a better offer.

If you feel you’re in a position to negotiate, make sure you can present a strong case as to what you’ll bring to the company. Non-financial compensation including vacation, benefits or bonuses are other elements that can, in some cases, be more flexible than salary. In any negotiation, make your genuine interest in the job known when asking for an increase in salary or benefits. If the offer is firm, consider asking about the frequency of performance appraisals and salary reviews.

Entering the workforce after graduation can be challenging and exciting, both emotionally and financially. When beginning your first professional job, it’s a great time to develop a financial plan that can adapt as your needs change. It’s important to consider how you’ll afford your everyday expenses while setting enough aside for the future. A financial security advisor can help you plan for your financial future and offer you valuable tips about topics like budgeting, saving, investing and the power of compound interest. Establishing good financial habits early in your professional career can help you stay on track for years to come.


The information provided is based on current laws, regulations and other rules applicable to Canadian residents. It is accurate to the best of our knowledge as of the date of publication. Rules and their interpretation may change, affecting the accuracy of the information. The information provided is general in nature, and should not be relied upon as a substitute for advice in any specific situation. For specific situations, advice should be obtained from the appropriate legal, accounting, tax or other professional advisors.


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